Jeffrey Sachs

Jeffrey David Sachs (born November 5, 1954) is an American economist and director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University. One of the youngest tenured economics professors in the history of Harvard University (at age 28), Sachs became known for his role as an adviser to Eastern European and developing country governments during the transition from communism to a market system or during periods of economic crisis. Subsequently he has been known for his work on the challenges of economic development, environmental sustainability, poverty alleviation, debt cancellation, and globalization.

Sachs is the Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs and a professor of health policy and management at Columbia’s School of Public Health. He is special adviser to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon on the Millennium Development Goals, having held the same position under former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. He is co-founder and chief strategist of Millennium Promise Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending extreme poverty and hunger. From 2002 to 2006, he was director of the United Nations Millennium Project’s work on the Millennium Development Goals, eight internationally sanctioned objectives to reduce extreme poverty, hunger, and disease by the year 2015. He is director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Since 2010 he also served as a commissioner for the Broadband Commission for Digital Development, which leverages broadband technologies as a key enabler for social and economic development. Since 1995, he is also a member of the International Advisory Council of the Center for Social and Economic Research (CASE).

Sachs has authored three New York Times bestsellers: The End of Poverty (2005), Common Wealth (2008), and The Price of Civilization (2011). His most recent book is To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace (2013). He has been named one of Time Magazine’ +s "100 Most Influential People in the World" twice, in 2004 and 2005.

It is time for the United States and other powers to let the Middle East govern itself in line with national sovereignty and the United Nations Charter.